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Rector’s Message

Dear Lenten People,

Our Lenten journey to the cross with the Lord has begun. The ashes marked on our foreheads last Wednesday   literally mark us—remind us—commit us to a season of repentance, change and prayer. Will this Lenten Season come and go like any other 40 day period in our life? Or possibly, can the Lenten Season allow me to probe my heart and look for an area of my life that needs change, healing or growth?

Erma Bombeck, the well known author, wrote the following reflection after she found out she was dying from cancer. Bombeck’s honest self-evaluation offers all of us an opportunity to look within our heart and change—while there is still time!

 

If I Had My Life to Live Over

I would have gone to bed when I was sick instead of pretending the earth would go into a holding pattern if I weren’t there for the day.

I would have burned the pink candle sculpted like a rose before it melted in storage.

I would have talked less and listened more.

I would have invited friends over for dinner even if the carpet was stained, or the sofa faded.

I would have eaten the popcorn in the “good” living room and worried much less about the dirt when someone wanted to light a fire in the fireplace.

I would have taken the time to listen to my grandfather ramble on about his youth.

I would have shared more of the responsibility carried by my husband.

I would never have insisted that the car windows be rolled up on a summer day because my hair had just been teased and sprayed.

I would have cried and laughed less while watching television and more while watching life.

I would never have bought anything just because it was practical, wouldn’t show soil, or was guaranteed to last a lifetime.

Instead of wishing away nine months of pregnancy, I’d have cherished every moment and realized that the wonderment growing  inside me was the only chance in life to assist God in a miracle.

When my kids kissed me impetuously, I would never have said, “Later. Now go get washed up for dinner.”
There would have been more “I love you’s. More “I’m sorry’s.”

But mostly, given another start in life, I would seize every minute . . .  look at it and really see it  . . . live it . . . and never give it back.

Never sweat the small stuff.

Don’t worry about who doesn’t like you, who has more, or who’s doing what.

Instead, let’s cherish the relationships we have with those who do love us. (including the Lord!)

 

And I would add the following questions—

Is there someone I need to forgive? Is life making me bitter or better? Do I participate in the Liturgy every weekend? Can I spend ten minutes a day in prayer this Lent as a way to grow, heal and forgive?”

 

And at the same time, keep life in perspective and balance. Change begins today—one day at a time! Keep reading . . .

 

A group of 40 year old buddies discuss where they should meet for dinner. Finally, it is agreed upon that they should meet at the Ocean View restaurant because the waitresses are cute.

10 years later, at 50 years of age, the group once again discuss and discuss where they should meet for dinner. Finally, it is agreed that they should meet at the Ocean View restaurant because the food there is very good and the wine selection is good also.

10 years later at 60 years of age, the group once again discuss and discuss where they should meet for dinner. Finally, it is agreed that they should meet at the Ocean View restaurant because they can eat there in peace and quiet and the restaurant had a beautiful view of the ocean.

10 years later, at 70 years of age, the group once again discuss and discuss where they should meet for dinner. Finally, it is agreed that they should meet at the Ocean View restaurant because the restaurant is wheel chair accessible and they even have an elevator.

10 years later, at 80 years of age, the group once again discuss and discuss where they should meet for dinner. Finally, it is agreed that they should meet at the Ocean View restaurant because they have never been there before.

 

Our Lenten journey has begun—may we not be left behind.

Walking with you,

Fr. Greg